Google Vice President Vint Cerf has issued a warning that all the digitally stored content might be wiped out massively by tech upgrades and the threat is for all data stored digitally.

Digital Black Hole: How dangerous is it?

Digital Black Hole: How dangerous is it?

Amidst fears of such a black hole wiping out all digital data, pioneers are on the quest to find ways to save the data. The major portion of the information we share every day is ephemeral. On the other hand, most of the pictures taken today are uploaded online to a photo sharing or storing site from a digital camera and so no physical copy of the photo is available.
There have been some attempts in the past to safeguard the digital data. A library of congress in the US signed an agreement in 2010 with Twitter to maintain an archive of public tweets that were sent since Twitter’s inception. These tweets were made available for research and stored as historical evidence. The British Library has also taken bold steps to rectify the scenario of digital black hole.
If information is lost in this black hole, it will be taken down from the web page and as a result, the whole website would shut down. Although it just looks like a loss of words and images stored digitally, it is actually the loss of a massive amount of information for which there is no physical evidence. What’s once lost would remain lost forever.
The British Library has estimated that the two million recordings in its repository are fragile and are at the risk of being completely wiped out without a trace. Thus, the records that are on reel to reel tapes and lacquer discs are at the risk of not only deterioration but also obsolescence. Thus, it becomes increasingly important to safeguard digitally stored data from obsolescence and deletion.