If emergency interventions had not been in place at 11 of the failing hospital trusts in England, there could have been hundreds of unnecessary deaths, according to a recent report.

Hospital death averts put into special measures

Hospital death averts put into special measures

The report published by Dr Foster a data analysis company shows that the poorly performing hospitals were identified in the wake of the Stafford Hospital Scandal. Researchers have found that average death rates fell after urgent measures such as leadership changes were taken. However, Labor party says that the problems with emergency wards still persist.
Hundreds of people still suffered appalling care at Stafford Hospital in the years after 2008 and inquiries say that some of them may have died needlessly as a result of it. The scandal prompted a review of hospital trusts in 2013 and 11 of them were put in special measures. A range of problems were found such as patients were left on trolleys for longer periods and poor maintenance of operating theaters.
The measures also included sending the staff in teams for external experts to work with the senior management team. Regular updates on the patients were requested and some of the unsafe practices such as the use of operating theaters with inadequate maintenance records. Analysts from Dr Foster have tracked the death rates and it was found that they were placed under a regime of special measures.
When the death rates were compared to the expected deaths, it was found that it is reasonable to conclude that “hundreds of deaths that might otherwise have occurred without the intervention did not happen”. Even though they found that the death rates have fallen across the English hospitals since 2013 September, the downward trend was more observed in the special measure trusts including the 11 hospitals, considered as a group.