As the glaciers in Iceland have begun to melt as a result of global warming, the weight pushing down on the land has reduced greatly and the land has started to rise by approximately 1.4 inches annually in some areas, according to scientists from the University of Iceland and the University of Arizona.

Iceland’s land begins to rise as the ice melts

Iceland’s land begins to rise as the ice melts

It is the same effect as that of a trampoline when the weight is lifted off it. As the weight is lifted, it rises and in this case, the trampoline is the land of Iceland. The team of scientists who predicted this has also forecast that the volcanic activity might also increase as a result and notably, due to deglaciation , volcanic eruptions were more common nearly 12,000 years ago.
The findings of the study are published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The researchers also claimed that their study was the first to outline the direct link between the rising of land levels as a result of deglaciation and global warming today that started in the 1980s.
Some of the sites that were studied by the team in south-central Iceland were found to have risen up to 1.4 inches per year. The lead author of the report, Kathleen Compton, a geosciences doctoral candidate said, “Our research makes the connection between recent accelerated uplift and the accelerated melting of the Icelandic ice caps.”
She also said that it was already known that as glaciers melt, the weight of the land reduces and however, it remained unsure that whether the current rise of land was due to the loss of ice recently or past deglaciation. Co-author Professor Richard Bennett said, “Iceland is the first place we can say accelerated uplift means accelerated ice mass loss.” The study made use of the geodesy technique to report its findings.